Features

The Great Game: Waterloo Replayed

More than 200 years after the final defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte changed the course of European history the bloody Battle of Waterloo is to be […]

Twitter

scotcorrespond RT @MargieWiarton: This Saturday is the Canadian Fling🎉 @FlingLimestone!!! Join @ScottJKyle1 and fellow @ScottsKylanders @OutlandersInOn i…
21hreplyretweetfavorite
scotcorrespond RT @PSiadhail: Would you like to no more about myself and my work? Check out pages 80-85 in this edition of @scotcorrespond https://t.co/NI
21hreplyretweetfavorite
scotcorrespond RT @MacqueenPhoto: Castle on The Cliffs’ The story behind this image & others will be told in my Artist Talk @GlasgowArtClub on Thursday 2…
23hreplyretweetfavorite
scotcorrespond RT @ScottJKyle1: Taking on the role of Annan Ness in @HeartsMcCrae & combining my love of football with my passion for storytelling has bee…
23hreplyretweetfavorite
scotcorrespond RT @PSiadhail: Brilliant magazine... and it's free! If you like anything Scottish be sure to take a read! #Scotland https://t.co/L04rbugmGB

Facebook

Did you know Scots have been enjoying Indian spices and cuisine since the 1700s and curry has been called Scotland’s ‘other national dish’? Now, a boutique Highland hotel is merging Scotland’s history and scenery with authentic indian food.
Rokeby Manor Hotel of @theblacksheephotels is a 13-ensuite bedroom property which has been completely refurbished and serves authentic Indian cuisine, alongside traditional Scottish fare. Check it out in Scotland Correspondent bit.ly/2YSy74q
See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Outlander actor Scott Kyle is taking on a new role as a star columnist for Scotland Correspondent magazine.
The award winning stage and screen performer joins the editorial team for this month’s issue (August 2019) of the free, multi-media digital magazine that promotes all things Scottish to a global audience.
Scott, who has a personal following of close to a million fans around the world through his social media presence, says he aims to highlight Scots-grown talent, showcase the best of his homeland and share his personal experiences of working in the arts and theatre. He begins with a personal peep behind the walls of ancient Holyroodhouse, Scotland’s most important royal palace and once home to tragic Mary Queen of Scots.
The Glasgow-born actor is currently appearing in the stage production of ‘A War of Two Halves’ at the 2019 Edinburgh Festival Fringe and has just finished filming the upcoming BBC drama ‘Trust Me’. He has recently taken up a post of visiting lecturer with the Edinburgh Acting Academy.
“I have already had an overwhelming response to my first piece – thousands of wonderful messages from all over the world,” said Scott. “Readers have wished me well and been generous with their praise. I feel this is a unique and exciting opportunity – until now, my musings have mostly been confined to Twitter.
“Now, that I’m no longer restricted to just 280 characters, I can really use the space to write about subjects close to my heart and, hopefully, of interest to the many millions of people who hold Scotland close to their hearts no matter where they are in the world.”
The digital only magazine, which has readers in more than 60 countries, was launched in January 2017
See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

It’s 274 years this month (19 August) since Prince Charles Edward Stuart raised his standard at Glenfinnan and started the 1745 Jacobite rising – which ended so badly in 1746.
Talented photographer Gavin Macqueen’s photo, called Raising the Standard, is one of a number of fantastic images displayed in a solo exhibition at The Glasgow Art Club. It commemorates that moment in history. Unfortunately, we only had room to show a few of his images in this month’s Scotland Correspondent bit.ly/2OOTOh8
See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

On this day 1296 King Edward I of England stole the Stone of Destiny from Scotland and took it to London where it remained for over 650 years until its return to Edinburgh Castle in 1996.
Shrouded in mystery and legend the stone attracts thousands of visitors every year. For some it is a symbol of national pride and others just a lump of rock but Kings have feared it and men have died for it.
Its true origins remain a riddle, shrouded in mystery and wrapped in legend but it is said to be the rock used as a pillow by the biblical Patriarch Jacob when he dreamed of a ladder to heaven, as described in the Book of Genesis. How it got to Scotland nobody knows although one story claims it arrived via Ireland with an Egyptian princess who fell in love with a Celtic prince.
Little more than two feet long and weighing 336 pounds the oblong red sandstone artefact was used to anoint Scotland’s monarchs for centuries, until it was stolen by Edward I as a spoil of war and transported to Westminster Abbey. He believed if he sat on the stone he could claim to be Scotland’s king. He had the rock built into his throne and it has been used in the coronation ceremonies of every monarch of England and Great Britain since.
For more than 650 years it sat secure in Westminster Abbey until Christmas Day when 1950 four Scottish students – Ian Hamilton, Gavin Vernon, Kay Matheson, and Alan Stuart – broke in with the intention of stealing it back for Scotland.
The escapade, which was turned into a movie in 2009, resulted in a frantic nationwide police hunt. Despite the best efforts of the authorities the Stone was not discovered until four months later, in April 1951, when it was left on the alter of Arbroath Abbey, the location of the signing of the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320.
The stone was quickly taken back to London where it remained until 1996 when it was symbolically transported to Scotland, on condition it is returned to Westminster Abbey for the next and all future coronations of monarchs of Great Britain.
On St Andrews Day 1996 thousands of people lined the streets of Edinburgh to see the Stone complete a 400 mile journey, under armed police escort, from Westminster Abbey in London to Edinburgh Castle.
Many people have doubts the stone is authentic. Faced with an invading English army in 1296 the Abbot of Scone is said to have buried the real stone and switched it with a fake to fool King Edward.
Whatever the true origins of The Stone of Destiny it remains a truly unique symbol of power and history which continues to captivate and intrigue visitors to Edinburgh Castle in equal measure.
See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Seven students who blazed a trail for women’s access to higher education have been awarded posthumous honorary degrees – 150 years after beginning their studies.
The group – known as the Edinburgh Seven – were among the first women admitted to a UK university when they enrolled to study medicine at Edinburgh in 1869.
The women faced substantial resistance from their male peers and were ultimately prevented from graduating and qualifying as doctors.
Their campaign against such treatment gained national attention and many supporters, including Charles Darwin. It resulted in legislation in 1877 to ensure women could study at university.
Now, a century and a half later, Mary Anderson, Emily Bovell, Matilda Chaplin, Helen Evans, Sophia Jex-Blake, Edith Pechey and Isabel Thorne have finally been awarded the posthumous honorary MBChB during a special ceremony at the University of Edinburgh. Full story bit.ly/31nUrPW
See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook